As in the American artist Veryl Goodnight, whose sculpture The Day The Wall Came Down stands proudly along the Clayallee in Berlin-Zehlendorf in front of the Allied Museum. When I lived in Berlin back in 2001, this statue was something I passed on a daily basis, and whenever I was headed home, I knew there was not far to go anymore whenever I passed the horses.

Grunewald14
The Day The Wall Came Down by Veryl Goodnight / Photography ©MTHerzog 

On Easter Sunday, my daughter and I took a long nostalgic walk through the Grunewald, weaving our way through the forest towards the Grunewald lake where all the dogs love to splash around and play. The weather was typical for April in Berlin, bright and sunny one moment, pouring rain the next. With my luck, as always here in this city, it rained when I didn’t need it to. But there is something refreshingly intimate about standing under the arch of the Jagdschloss Grunewald, an old hunting castle with my daughter while watching the rain.

We took a different route home and walked along the Clayallee for old times sake, passing the old cluster of buildings that we called home, her kindergarten, and even stopping to grin at the McDonalds with the oddly placed Ronald McDonald on the roof which she still finds creepy to this day. Next door is the Allied Museum, where nothing seems to have changed from the outside.

I came to a full stop, however, upon reaching the horses and couldn’t resist taking a shot. It is something I have always wanted to do but never really bothered. Now I know why. Its symbolism of freedom and the “victory of the human spirit” take on a brand new definition in my life now, as I recover from tragedy and find my way back out of the forest. For the full story of the statue and the video, visit Veryl Goodnight’s Homepage. If you are a fan of the American West and horses, this is definitely a site for you!

*Click HERE for the article with the full set of photographs

Advertisements